Plant Answers  >  BAMBOO IS USUALLY DAMN-BOO

BAMBOO IS USUALLY DAMN-BOO



CONNECTICUT TAKES ON INVASIVE BAMBOO!!!
More info at Institute of Invasive Bamboo Research's Page

Institute of Invasive Bamboo Research:
* Conn. Residents thank the 23 Co-sponsors of SB 1016 - AN AN ACT REGULATING THE PLANTING AND SALE OF RUNNING BAMBOO: Rep. Patricia M. Widlitz, 98th Dist., Rep. Elissa T. Wright, 41st Dist., Sen. Andrea L. Stillman, 20th Dist., Rep. Theresa W. Conroy, 105th Dist., Sen. Gary D. LeBeau, 3rd Dist., Rep. Kevin Ryan, 139th Dist., Rep. Patricia A. Dillon, 92nd Dist., Rep. Philip J. Miller, 36th Dist., Rep. Selim G. Noujaim, 74th Dist., Rep. Jonathan Steinberg, 136th Dist., Rep. Livvy R. Floren, 149th Dist., Rep. Cecilia Buck-Taylor, 67th Dist., Rep. Thomas A. Vicino, 35th Dist., Rep. Paul Davis, 117th Dist., Rep. Russell A. Morin, 28th Dist., Rep. DebraLee Hovey, 112th Dist., Rep. Christopher A. Wright, 77th Dist., Rep. Gregory Haddad, 54th Dist., Rep. Hilda E. Santiago, 84th Dist., Sen. Andrew M. Maynard, 18th Dist., Sen. Catherine A. Osten, 19th Dist., Sen. Toni Nathaniel Harp, 10th Dist., Sen. Anthony J. Musto, 22nd Dist.
Read More....
May 29, 2013
Institute of Invasive Bamboo Research:
http://connecticut.cbslocal.com/2013/05/24/bamboo-bill-moves-to-governor/

Bamboo Bill Moves To Governor - CBS Connecticut
connecticut.cbslocal.com
Connecticut lawmakers are sending the governor a bill that would penalize people who fail to contain the growth of bamboo on their property..
May 29, 2013 at 7:03pm • Like • 7..
Emma Huller:
Good for you! Be proud!
May 29, 2013 at 7:20pm • Like • 3..
Priscilla Weadon:
A huge THANK you for everyone in Hartford who helped move this bill forward to fuition.
May 29, 2013 at 7:51pm • Like • 5..
Priscilla Weadon:
Now CT homeowners have some recourse and money damages that they will need to REMOVE the bamboo planted by neighbors!!
May 29, 2013 at 7:53pm • Like • 4..
Sandra Suffredini:
good job.
May 30, 2013 at 6:52am • Like • 4..
Beverly Smithson Stevens:
Congratulations! Here's hoping that the powers that be in other states wake up and see the bamboo problem.
May 30, 2013 at 2:13pm • Like • 4..
Errol Groff:
Thank you for your wisdom, experience and hard work on passing this historic bamboo legislation. Once again CT Legislators see the beauty of our great state and want to do everything possible to keep CT as free of invasive & damaging plants as possible. God bless all of you. Terri Groff.
May 30, 2013 at 1:10pm • Like • 6..
Institute of Invasive Bamboo Research:
* Conn. Residents thank Chair of the Environment Committee - Sen. Edward Meyer, 12th Dist., Sen. Carlo Leone, 27th Dist., and all of the 25 Co-sponsors of SB 1016 - AN AN ACT REGULATING THE PLANTING AND SALE OF RUNNING BAMBOO: Rep. Patricia M. Widlitz, 98th Dist., Rep. Elissa T. Wright, 41st Dist., Sen. Andrea L. Stillman, 20th Dist., Rep. Theresa W. Conroy, 105th Dist., Sen. Gary D. LeBeau, 3rd Dist., Rep. Kevin Ryan, 139th Dist., Rep. Patricia A. Dillon, 92nd Dist., Rep. Philip J. Miller, 36th Dist., Rep. Selim G. Noujaim, 74th Dist., Rep. Jonathan Steinberg, 136th Dist., Rep. Livvy R. Floren, 149th Dist., Rep. Cecilia Buck-Taylor, 67th Dist., Rep. Thomas A. Vicino, 35th Dist., Rep. Paul Davis, 117th Dist., Rep. Russell A. Morin, 28th Dist., Rep. DebraLee Hovey, 112th Dist., Rep. Christopher A. Wright, 77th Dist., Rep. Gregory Haddad, 54th Dist., Rep. Hilda E. Santiago, 84th Dist., Sen. Andrew M. Maynard, 18th Dist., Sen. Catherine A. Osten, 19th Dist., Sen. Toni Nathaniel Harp, 10th Dist., Sen. Anthony J. Musto, 22nd Dist.
Read More....

Bill Status
www.cga.ct.gov

Connecticut General Assembly Official Legislative Site for Bills, Legislation, Statutes, and sessional activity. Visit our site to find all your legislative information
May 30, 2013 at 5:50pm • Like • 9..
Institute of Invasive Bamboo Research:
* UPDATED * Conn. Residents thank 27 CO-SPONSORS - Rep. Louis P. Esposito, 116th Dist., Rep. Kim Rose, 118th Dist., Chair of the Environment Committee - Sen. Edward Meyer, 12th Dist., Sen. Carlo Leone, 27th Dist., and all of the 27 Co-sponsors of SB 1016 - AN AN ACT REGULATING THE PLANTING AND SALE OF RUNNING BAMBOO: Rep. Patricia M. Widlitz, 98th Dist., Rep. Elissa T. Wright, 41st Dist., Sen. Andrea L. Stillman, 20th Dist., Rep. Theresa W. Conroy, 105th Dist., Sen. Gary D. LeBeau, 3rd Dist., Rep. Kevin Ryan, 139th Dist., Rep. Patricia A. Dillon, 92nd Dist., Rep. Philip J. Miller, 36th Dist., Rep. Selim G. Noujaim, 74th Dist., Rep. Jonathan Steinberg, 136th Dist., Rep. Livvy R. Floren, 149th Dist., Rep. Cecilia Buck-Taylor, 67th Dist., Rep. Thomas A. Vicino, 35th Dist., Rep. Paul Davis, 117th Dist., Rep. Russell A. Morin, 28th Dist., Rep. DebraLee Hovey, 112th Dist., Rep. Christopher A. Wright, 77th Dist., Rep. Gregory Haddad, 54th Dist., Rep. Hilda E. Santiago, 84th Dist., Sen. Andrew M. Maynard, 18th Dist., Sen. Catherine A. Osten, 19th Dist., Sen. Toni Nathaniel Harp, 10th Dist., Sen. Anthony J. Musto, 22nd Dist.
Read More....

Bill Status
www.cga.ct.gov

Connecticut General Assembly Official Legislative Site for Bills, Legislation, Statutes, and sessional activity. Visit our site to find all your legislative information
May 30, 2013 at 5:50pm • Like • 7..
Institute of Invasive Bamboo Research
*** CONN HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES LIVE MAY 23, 2013 CLICK ON 2:29 Bamboo Bill [starts at 2:29 ] - [ends at 3:05] See the VOTE at 3:05 on the tape. http://ct-n.com/ctnplayer.asp?odID=9042
June 2, 2013 at 3:51am • Like • 7..
Jerry M. Parsons:
YOU GO, CONNECTICUT!!!!!!!!!!
June 2, 2013 at 3:07pm • Like • 1..

 

When you do a "Search for the Answer" on PLANTanswers.com for the term "Bamboo", you get this write-up:

"In the proper setting, ornamental bamboo is useful as a specimen plant, screen or windbreak. Unfortunately, some bamboos SHOULD NEVER be planted this side of Hell!!! But some species of bamboo are aggressive creepers and become a real nuisance when spreading to areas where they are not wanted. From this uncontrollable, rampant growth pattern comes the common name for bamboo in this area -- Damn-boo. The aggressive bamboo can indiscriminately emerge through concrete walks, home foundations and even in darkened garages! There is more than one way to control bamboo. The choice of a method or the combination of methods depends on the circumstances under which it is growing."

"A large clump of bamboo looks as though it would be hard to dig out -- but it really is not. Its many horizontal rootstocks are close to the surface. All pieces of the shoots and rootstocks should be removed or regrowth will occur."



Timber Bamboo is the strongest wood in the world


"Cutting bamboo shoots close to the ground, then removing the regrowth each time it reaches 20 to 24 inches in height will eventually kill established plants. Success with this method depends on exhausting the food reserves stored in the roots. The prompt removal of the shoots as they reach 20 to 24 inches is essential It will have to be performed many times over a period of a year or more."

"The length of time required for eradication can be considerably reduced by using the right chemical in the right way. There are several types from which to choose:

--Sprays that kill only the foliage they contact, such as cacodylic acid or vinegar for the organic souls, should be applied each time the regrowth reaches 20 to 24 inches in height. These chemicals substitute for the cutting of the shoots; their application must be repeated to starve the root.

-- Sprays that are taken up by the leaves, such as dalapon, MSMA, DSMA and glyphosate, and carried down to kill roots. Dalapon is available as Dowpon and glyphosate is available as Glyphosate, Roundup, Klean-up and Weed-and-Grass Killer. Spray the actively growing leaves to wet and allow a six hour drying period. Even with these herbicides and mixing a double strength solution, repeated treatments will be necessary to completely eradicate established plants. To prevent these chemicals from injuring roots of trees and shrubs in the area, irrigate thoroughly before treating. Then do not irrigate again for 7-10 days."

"The bamboo should ONLY be planted in an inclosed, "containable" area from which this devil-plant can escape. The majority of "problem" bamboo originates from a neighbor's planting. So BE CAREFUL and BE CONSIDERATE when planting bamboo or better yet, NEVER plant DAMNBOO!"


Before long these folks will have to use a machete to get a hamburger!

I wrote this on July 1, 1990, and unfortunately the bamboo situation has not improved. Invasions continue to occur from uninformed people who plant bamboo as a screen and eventually move away to leave the entire neighborhood to battle this horrible creature. Nearly twenty years ago I gave this horror the name "Damn-boo" in honor of the many neighbors who battle this pestilence year-after-year and cannot move to another neighborhood.

In 1995 when PLANTanswers was started, I shared the horror story of bamboo, now Damn-boo, with the world. It was not long that the few dozen people who actually like bamboo in Texas begin to show their colors:

QUESTION/COMMENT: Thank you for the valuable resource that you provide at PLANTanswers.com -- I am a big user and fan of your network. As a master gardener I value your resources but, as a bamboo enthusiast I must take some exception with your fact sheet attached to the bamboo web. Your description of DAMNBOO is certainly deserved for some instances but - so is English ivy, morning glory, Bermuda grass, etc. You do not give nearly enough information about non-invasive (clumping, pacymorph, very slow growing or climate restricted leptomor phs, etc.) types that deserve better press for Texas gardeners. Bamboo is not only beautiful as a container/contained specimen plant, it is a great erosion control species, an good edible crop, timber/pulp alternative and a fabulous "mow it once a year" ground cover. How about letting some real experts (not me particularly) do some work on your web link to make this more accurate? I'm not just a hair-brained big grass nut.

RESPONSE: No, maybe not a grass nut but DEFINITELY a bit on the naive side when dealing with the here-and-now of bamboo!! We never have trouble controlling "English ivy, morning glory, Bermuda grass, etc." - to compare them to bamboo is foolish. Your description of bamboo as "a beautiful as a container/contained specimen plant, it is a great erosion control species, a good edible crop, timber/pulp alternative and a fabulous "mow it once a year ground cover" brings to mind two other such plants which were introduced into the U.S. with the same claims - kudzu and nutsedge!!

However, you are not the only person who has called our attention to the "vicious attack" on bamboo - YOU ARE THE SECOND among thousands who want to know how to control your "useful" plant.

SECOND COMMENT: Whoever wrote that piece on "Damnboo" needs to get a grip or at least understand that not all of us live in suburban neighborhoods. I live on a spectacular piece of salt water and have a fine neighbor (a professional fisher person) who has a yard full of old machinery, dead boats etc. I also have a flourishing stand of running (invasive) bamboo between us and another neighbor. My problem is not controlling the existing stuff, but transplanting it to the roadside/driveway verge between us and the first-mentioned neighbor. I have tried digging up new shoots and transplanting with zero survival rate. Because of vicious attacks like yours, no self-respecting nursery carries real bamboo any more, so what should I do? Suggestions for other evil, invasive large plants that will grow in the shade of coastal South Carolina will also be appreciated.

Another "evil" plant that makes a good screen is Arundo donax (giant reed), a grass that looks like a bamboo, but has a more refined ornamental habit. Pampas grass is also another good one, but it is not as tall and is a more contained clump former.


Sometimes a military tank can't pentrate a bamboo hedge

RESPONSE TO THE SECOND COMMENT: I guess the old saying "One person's trash is another person's treasure" applies to bamboo but I hate to even use the idea that there is a place where the spreading bamboo can be safely planted. Of course, those who know bamboo say there are dwarf, slowly spreading forms of the plant which are wonderful for landscapes. "Damnboo" is the commonly cultivated Phyllostachys aurea (Golden Bamboo). I realize I am stereotyping the other hundreds of types of bamboo. However, 99% of all bamboo sold is the invasive, indestructible type because nurseries can propagate that form much faster. This type of invasive bamboo should NEVER be sold to the unsuspecting public because it is practically un-stoppable.

Since you think I am over-reacting, let me give you my perspective on this situation. I have been an Extension Horticulturist in San Antonio for over 20 years. Barely a week goes by or a talk radio garden show ends that the horrors of bamboo are not exposed. I have seen complete yards taken over; I have seen concrete sidewalks buckled by; I have seen garages (closed to outside light) filled with; I have seen swimming pool foundations cracked and punctured; I have seen it actually grow into houses and crack foundations; ALL by invading bamboo. All of these commonly occurring incidents have one thing in common - the neighbor who planted the bamboo has moved away. I have NEVER found the culprit who planted bamboo in a ravaged neighborhood. Obviously, these folks took the best advice we give to people concerning how to get rid of bamboo - SELL your property and MOVE far away.


Able to lift landscape timbers with a single sprout-- it has to be the dreaded Damn-Boo!


Some might say control and containment is the answer to this specific type of bamboo. IT AIN'T GONNA HAPPEN!!! The professional horticulturists at the San Antonio zoo (one of which is a member of the Bamboo Society and a great proponent of the "good guys" bamboo!!) decided to plant the indestructible bamboo in concrete containers and put them in the lion and tiger cages. You want to guess who won that battle of survival?! The bamboo root system cracked the concrete containers, found some cracks in the concrete floor of the animal cages and within two years had gotten so thick that they had to take the lions and tigers out of the cages. They are now stuck with trying to control bamboo through a concrete floor - it is an everlasting battle.

Horticulturists have gotten so many calls about how to control bamboo-out-of-control and the options are so few that one fellow began offering a plan to co-exist with this invasive plant by thinning the canes into a Japanese garden style!! The rampant bamboo is comparable to snakes and mushrooms - the majority of snakes and mushrooms are harmless but the few that are poisonous are deadly. I do not recommend that people eat wild mushrooms; I do not recommend that people pick up unknown snakes in the woods; and I do not recommend that people EVER plant bamboo.



With constant pruning your bamboo forest from you rneighbors yard canlook like this!!


I appreciate the above compliment "Because of vicious attacks like yours, no self-respecting nursery carries real bamboo any more" - I can only hope that I have done something to eliminate this horrible pest. Maybe then the void can be filled with the "good-guys" bamboo and we can all live happily ever after. I have been growing some extremely dwarf bamboo which unfortunately spreads so slowly it will probably never become commercially feasible. I had planned to use it as a turf replacement and name it NO - MO since you would not have to mow it NO - MO; you would not have to water or fertilize it NO - MO; you would not have children walking across or playing in your yard NO - MO because of the bamboo spikes which would be formed when you did mow it!!! It sounds like the best turf sod ever - GOTTA LOVE THAT BAMBOO or is it D A M B O O !?!?

Until more of the "good" bamboo becomes readily available, the bamboo-is-DAMNboo tag will have to stay. The majority of people who come to PLANTanswers and inquire about bamboo are trying to GET RID OF IT!! PLANTanswers has had TWO people complaining about the DAMNboo nomenclature. So now that we have the bamboo situation clarified, let us look at some options.

I mentioned in 1990 that "sprays can be used that are taken up by the leaves, such as dalapon, MSMA, DSMA and glyphosate, and carried down to kill roots. Dalapon is available as Dowpon and glyphosate is available as Glyphosate, Roundup, Klean-up and Weed-and-Grass Killer. Spray the actively growing leaves to wet and allow a six hour drying period. Even with these herbicides and mixing a double strength solution, repeated treatments will be necessary to completely eradicate established plants. To prevent these chemicals from injuring roots of trees and shrubs in the area, irrigate thoroughly before treating. Then do not irrigate again for 7-10 days." Some Damn-boo Rambos have found that there is a better way to apply the glyphosate herbicide.

A technique which has worked for some folks is:

1. Cut the emerging bamboo off just below the first node or beginning of second section on a shoot.

2. Cutting below the first node exposes a hollow stem. With a dropper or sprayer, immediately fill this entire hollow stem or cavity with pure, undiluted glyphosate herbicide once a week for a month.

3. Wait 3 months, then dig up what is left of the root system. Pull as much of the runners out as possible. Some of these runners may be 12 feet long.



To get rid of DamnBoo you have to use the herbicide Remedy


Other people who are wanting to commit bamboo-icide are using a more potent chemical named Remedy. Remedy is a glyphosate-on-steroids and should not be used in the vicinity of desirable trees and shrubs. Bamboo is not on the Remedy label; so people will need to be treating the hackberry or oak seedlings growing in-and-amongst the bamboo. Actually, there is not anything really labeled for bamboo specifically.

Remedy can be mixed with water or diesel. The most effective solution is a one part to 3 parts diesel solution. This will of course burn everything it hits, hence the cut off and treat is the easiest application and drift is not a big problem. You can mix the product with water as long as you use a good surfactant. However, the water mix has been known not to kill poison ivy. The Remedy label is at: http://www.cdms.net/ldat/ld0B4001.pdf Remedy is not a restricted use pesticide so anyone can purchase it. It is not readily available at nurseries but in San Antonio is sold by Estes Incorporated (Tel: 210-590-1012) at 4718 Center Park Boulevard for $105 per gallon (price on Sept., 2005).

Some folks may not want to become "natural born killers" and may want to hire a bamboo "assassin". People who claim to be able to take on Damn-boo and eradicate it are hard to find. In fact, I have found only one-let me know if you know of others. This person is in Austin and is a member of the Texas Bamboo Society and the American Bamboo Society. I was a bit suspicious until I saw the webpage at:
http://bamboospecialists.com/ It reads:

Did you know there are types of bamboo that DON'T spread ?

More on that at the end of this page. First let's talk about "Damn-Boo "

AGGRESSIVE !! INVASIVE!!!! TAKES OVER!!

In order for bamboo to become a nuisance it is necessary that it be regularly and consistently neglected over a number of years.

In this state, it not only fails to achieve its potential as an almost spiritual space, but it also becomes an attractive host to:

* accumulations of waste and refuse
* vermin and varmints
* grackles
* wasps
* cockroaches
* other unwanted visitors



Bamboo in a drought MAY look dead but DON'T BELIEVE IT!!!


In many cases local city waste disposal facilities won't accept bamboo material.

Dead and dying material which is not removed or mulched contributes to mold and mildew.

Branches and protruding stubs present a real hazard to those who would try to enjoy the depths of a grove.

Untended grove edges may violate city ordinances or threaten good neighbor relations.

When a grove is properly maintained it is never again necessary to remove dead material, or fight through a jungle of growth. Mature culms are harvested as a sustainable resource. Selective thinning takes places during shooting time.



I wonder why they refer to this as timber bamboo. Some bamboo lovers actually planted this at the Botanical Garden. Don't worry though--I am sure they can control it

The time for neglect is over.

Bamboo Specialists can help a grove reach its greatest potential or can remove the problem entirely,... permanently.

Clumping bamboos send their new shoots up right next it's neighbor. Running bamboos may put up a new shoot 10 or 12 ft from where the last one appeared. Clumpers stay in one spot, their base growing wider, slowly over the years.

There are many clumpers that make fine selections as plants to provide visual screen, sound barriers, and aesthetic appeal.

AND THEN THE PAGE WHICH READS: Bamboo Specialists began out of a deep appreciation for bamboo. We realize not everyone is so enamored, nor do we expect everyone to share our affection. (NO KIDDING!?!?!) In any case, our goal is to help you better enjoy life, with or without it. Bamboo that isn't appreciated needs to be removed from where it doesn't belong. Bamboo that appears to be getting out of control needs care and attention. If you know you want it gone we won't try to talk you out of it. If you'd like to know what bamboo could be, we'll try to show you.



Be careful where you have your picnic.


NOW A WORD FROM THE AUTHOR: If you decide to use these folks, I want to know how many of you they talk into keeping the bamboo and "managing it".

While we will NEVER accept the use of Damn-boo in residential landscapes, in the sake of fairness, we have put a link in the Miscellaneous Section of the Information Index at: http://www.plantanswers.com/resources.htm#misc of PLANTanswers.com under the title of Bamboo a link to: http://www.americanbamboo.org/FAQ.html which is a page by the American Bamboo Society trying to convince you that Damn-boo can be lovely Bamboo. This propaganda may convince a person whose landscape has not been invaded but those of us who have been "violated" by Damn-boo will never be fooled again!! "Fool me once, Shame on you!!! Fool me twice, Shame on ME!!"

QUESTION: I hate bamboo and it isn't my bamboo, however, it is growing on my property, is there anyway to kill that blasted stuff????? I've tried Roundup, thought about pouring diesel on it, I just don't know what to
do. Can you help?
ANSWER: I think this must be the first bamboo question we have EVER
received. Thanks for sending it in!!!!! It seems that we did write a
bit about this problem at: http://www.plantanswers.com/bamboo.htm

FOLLOW-UP COMMENT: *LOL* well, glad I could be the first. I did get
online and read some things last night about it. It is termed an "obedience plant" apparently, one guy said, "it is an obedience plant alright, when I was growing up I got it used on my rearend and it made me an obedient person." Another guy said, " use agent orange and napalm and you might want a helicopter." But I also got some other information about it as well that might be a little more helpful if I work like a dog at it. I will read what you all wrote. Thanks for replying.

ANOTHER FOLLOW-UP COMMENT: Well, it certainly is DAMN-boo, I can say that, I do have MSMA maybe I will try that and the part about keeping on cutting the stalks that shoot up is what I read last night, that is the way it gets its food/energy and not getting it will kill it, that was what I meant by working like a dog, but I always have anyway, so that shouldn't hurt any. It also mentioned the diesel, hey, when all else fails, get deisel...when you grow up in the country you learn these things...anyway, thanks again for sending it, I don't intend on living here but a few years, and I do want it to sell and a yard always is a selling point in my book. So like the article said, sell the property and move far away.

HELP!!!! for California

My city is seriously trying to help get a neighbor's invasive stand of running bamboo removed. Our City Council is DESPERATE to know of precedents wherein other cities have successfully used their nuisance law to require
abatement of bamboo, or passed an ordinance banning bamboo, especially if such ordinance was then successfully used retroactively.

They want to act quickly, as this stand is getting out of hand already, and due to placement, will already be very difficult to remove fully.

PLEASE, please respond!! I need to know if anyone there can help us with this.

======================================
======================================

Lynn Parsons has been researching the bamboo problem and laws for you. Below is what he found:

(1) See: Alien Invaders in Your Yard AND Don't Get Bamboozled at the bottom of:
http://www.greenmanshow.com/

(2) http://www.smdp.com/article/articles/2355/1/Hedge-frustration-is-growing/Page1.html

(3) http://www.lawguru.com/cgi/bbs/mesg.cgi?i=526492045

(4) I'm not having any luck finding ordinances passed against growing bamboo. I actually think a better approach would be to have ordinances which addressed remedies for encroachment of any plants such as bamboo onto another person's property(see attachment) rather than banning what people can plant.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.ci.tigard.orus/city_hall/departments/cd/current_planning/code_enforcement/articles/tree_next_door.asp

(5) http://aprendizdetodo.com/garden/?item=20030811

(6) http://www.ci.neptune-beach.fl.us/ordinance_pdfs/2006-02%20TREES.pdf

(7) Although the text is somewhat hard to read, here is anther case of litigation over damage to a neighbor's property done by bamboo. http://www.llalawfirm.com/experience.html




 


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